How to get your prospects to read your brochures and sales letters by Tom “Big Al” Schreiter

TomSchreiterDo your headlines and first sentences drive your prospects away with boredom or, do your headlines and first sentences draw your prospects’ attention and motivate them to read your materials with enthusiasm? Have you ever read a newspaper? How do you read the newspaper? Do you start at the upper left-hand corner and read everything until you get to the bottom right-hand corner of the last page? I don’t think so. I bet you only read certain articles. And how do you choose which articles to read? By the headlines. If the headline grabs your interest, you read the article. If the headline has no interest to you, you skip the article. You simply scan the newspaper headlines and make split-second decisions on what you’ll read.

Your prospects scan your prospecting materials.

 NULL That’s right. Your prospects scan your headlines and first sentences and decide if they’ll read your material… or turn their attention to other events in their lives.

This means you must put your best benefits, your best selling copy, and your best efforts into your headlines.

Want some examples? Compare these two headlines on a sales brochure that promotes a natural herbal sleep formula: 1. “Proprietary herbal relaxing formula.” 2. “The average person falls asleep in seven minutes.” The first headline is boring. The reader must think of a benefit. It doesn’t grab the reader’s attention. Unfortunately, this headline will prevent further reading by the prospect. The brochure may be discarded in the trash and the distributor’s investment is wasted. The second headline shocks the reader. It gets the reader involved. He thinks, “Wait! I don’t fall asleep in seven minutes. I toss and turn all night. What’s my problem? Let’s see what this brochure says about my problem.” Want another example? Compare these two headlines on a sales brochure that promotes a business opportunity: 1. “Enhance your lifestyle by creating residual income.” 2. “How to get an extra paycheck in your mailbox every month.” The first headline is general, has boring text with words like “enhance,” “lifestyle,” and “residual.” These words mean something to network marketers, but are foggy, unclear and generally meaningless to prospects. The second headline grabs the prospect’s attention because he can relate with the word, “paycheck.”

Prospects can visualize an extra paycheck in their mailbox. They can visualize their excitement of having an extra, unexpected paycheck to spend however they like.

Take a look at your brochures and prospecting tools now. Do your headlines and first sentences drive your prospects away with boredom or, do your headlines and first sentences draw your prospects’ attention and motivate them to read your materials with enthusiasm?

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